The Arab Steed is one of the first hotels in the southeast corner of the city, and since September 1849 there has been a hotel named the ‘Arab Steed’ on this site. The first, like many early colonial businesses, appears to have been a…

The Earl of Aberdeen Hotel, built in 1879-80, is an important part of Adelaide's original network of corner pubs. It shows the features of two different periods: a simple 19th Century style in the original part and a more elaborate 20th Century…

Sketches of the original Rob Roy Hotel date back to 1850. It was first licensed by Robert Peter ten years earlier in 1840, making it second only to the Queen’s Head in North Adelaide as the longest continuously operating hotel in Adelaide. The…

The General Havelock is a typical example of Adelaide’s commercial buildings from the 1870s. Built in 1873, the hotel was originally quite severe, without verandahs or balconies. These were probably added in 1887, when plans for alterations were…

The site of the current Tivoli Hotel has been an entertainment and meeting place since 1846. In its 170 year history, it has hosted music, public meetings, theatrical performances and pub rock icons. The hotel’s development followed the growing…

This former hotel is one of the city’s most important and precious heritage sites despite its humble appearance. The simple structure was built in 1839, just two years after Colonel William Light first laid out the city. The hotel is named Viscount…

Like so many of Adelaide’s heritage hotels, the Exeter has seen a number of makeovers since it opened on this site in 1851. The hotel we see today was rebuilt here in 1888- rumour had it due to competition from the nearby Tavistock Hotel. The…

The Prince Albert Hotel shows how drinking establishments developed in the southwest corner in the very early days of the colony. Built in 1854, it has strong connections to South Australia’s early German community. The name honours Queen…