Early Days

While enjoying the white cedars, it’s worth noting that the Park Lands have not always been as carefully tended to.

Beginning on the corner of East Terrace and Rundle Road, follow the tree-lined path into the park. This pathway or 'allee', lined with white cedars, dates from the mid-1870s. It is thought to be the first and oldest white cedar planting in the Park Lands. There is a policy to maintain the character of the pathway with new plantings.

While enjoying the white cedars, it’s worth noting that the Park Lands have not always been as carefully tended to. Following settlement in 1837, the combined effects of grazing and unchecked clearing for timber and firewood had turned this corner of the Park Lands into a dustbowl in summer, and a quagmire in winter. In fact, by the 1850s, the park had been reduced to nothing more than a rubbish tip. One letter to the editor of The Observer in 1856 described the scene:

“Hundreds of cart-loads of every description of refuse have, for a long time past, been ruthlessly scattered about upon the surface. Vegetable matter lies at leisure to decay; broken glass and bottles, mingled with old mattresses and tin-kettles; rags, bones, and dead dogs vary the scene with chemical refuse; … mingling their scents with so many others, that seventy distinct odours ... might be fairly counted over Adelaide.”

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