Bragg Park / Ngampa Yarta (Park 5)

Bragg Park / Ngampa Yarta, Park 5 is just under 5 hectares in size so it represents less than one per cent of the entire Adelaide Park Lands.

With its elevated position and views of the Adelaide Hills, this Park shows how Colonel. Light responded to the topography of the area in creating the plan for his City. The use of this land has shifted over time, from its use by the native Kaurna people, to despoiled grazing land; and from neglect and disuse, to becoming an important centre for one very specific community activity.

1. Bragg Park / Ngampa Yarta in context

With its elevated position and views of the Adelaide Hills, this Park shows how Colonel. Light responded to the topography of the area in creating the plan for his City. The use of this land has shifted over time, from its use by the Kaurna people,…

2. River She-Oak

Often confused for a pine, it is actually a flowering casuarina. Casuarina derives its name from the word for cassowary, and it’s easy to see the similarity between the she-oak’s foliage and the cassowary’s feathers. Species related to this one have…

4. Norfolk Island Pines

This original planting has since been maintained with additional plantings and the replacement of dead or unhealthy trees. You can see that the trees on the other side of the road (in Park 4) are much taller than the trees on this side in Park 5.…

5. Original alignment of Lefevre Road

Up until the 1960s Lefevre Rd was straight, not curved. The road re-alignment improved traffic congestion and made Bragg Park / Ngampa Yarta a little larger than it had been. The original path of Lefevre Road would have gone straight through where…

6. Changes to vegetation over time

From the 1850s to the 1870s, Bragg Park / Ngampa Yarta was used mainly for agistment of livestock, grazing and firewood collection. Within two decades of settlement, (by the 1860s) most of the native vegetation had been removed. An increased desire…

7. Canary Island Palms

In 1928, an avenue of about 70 Canary Island Palm trees was planted along Robe Terrace. They're still here, and you can see they are thickest where we turned right near the corner of Main North Rd. These Palms became such a well-recognised…

8. Medindie mansions

Unlike in the eastern States, most of the 19th century gentry of South Australia chose to build their mansions close to the city rather than on rural estates. Some of these mansions represent the vast fortunes that could be built in the early days of…

9. Bike Paths

Cycling is a convenient way to explore the Park Lands. With its broad, flat streets and a growing network of dedicated cycling paths, Adelaide is made to be seen on a bike. Adelaide City Council provides free bikes for hire. The nearest stations…

10. North Adelaide Dog Park

In 2009, a 13-year-old girl from North Adelaide Primary School started collecting signatures to create a fenced-off dog park in North Adelaide. The girl's name was Erin O'Brien. She got the idea because she had a friend, a woman who would…