On both sides of Sir Donald Bradman Drive you can see a collection of dome-like rock structures. This is a public art installation called the ‘Lie of the Land’ which opened in 2004.

The colonisation of Australia effectively dispossessed Aboriginal people who had lived on this continent for tens of thousands of years. In the Adelaide region, the First Nations people are known as the Kaurna people.

There are some general historical references to Kaurna and Aboriginal use of the western Park Lands, including this Park 24. This would have been a camping site before and after European settlement.

In 1844 the Protector of Aborigines, reported a gathering of Aboriginal clans, associated with what he called “an inter-tribal fight” here in this Park. Three to four hundred were gathered here with what the official said were “weapons for attack”.

The police confiscated and smashed those weapons as part of their intervention.

Aboriginal use of this Park continued for decades after European settlement, right into the late 1800s despite attempts by the colonial Government to prevent encampments.

On both sides of Sir Donald Bradman Drive you can see a collection of dome-like rock structures. This is a public art installation called the ‘Lie of the Land’, opened in 2004.

It was inspired by a drawing in the SA Art Gallery of indigenous Australians camped near Adelaide at the time of European settlement.

Artists Jude Walton and Aleks Danko won a design competition in 2001 to create an entry gateway statement for Adelaide, which would be visible en route from Adelaide Airport to the city.

The total display, on both sides of the road, comprises 25 structures. They are made primarily of stone from Kanmantoo, accompanied with sand, black Mallee box and plantings of kangaroo grass.

From here, walk west along Sir Donald Bradman Drive, turn right and enter the wooded area west of the driveway.

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